What Rough Beast?

 “Do every act of your life as if it were your last.” – Marcus Aurelius

I am not at all politically inclined — to save my sanity.  I simply do not understand the machinations of the modern political system.  On my 30 minute drive home each day, I listen to NPR, mostly for the Arts value, and rarely for commentary on the state of things.  There have been quite a few pieces about the Occupy Wall Street Protestors, and the people fighting for and against it.  Everyone is making this matter far worse than it has to be.  It is our right, as Americans, to protest injustice in our system.  This is the very thing that our country was built on, the very thing our constitution was written to protect.  We must be allowed to speak, we must be allowed to ask for equality in all things, we must coexist here.  However, we must understand what exactly we are protesting.

The Occupy Wall Street movement is a very important movement because it represents a microscopic look at the macroscopic problem we are faced with, not only in America but in the world as a whole.  Mathematically we would call this “self-similarity” — something exhibited in the structure of fractals.  Recently this has been applied to many things to show that the whole is represented by examining a small part of the entire object or system.

From the global population to each individual household, we can gauge the success of the whole by looking at the part.  When we are looking at the state of America, we can see that individual households are struggling, localities are struggling, on up to state then country.  And then these problems can be propagated down from the world to the individual. So what does this all mean?

The answers to our global problems must begin in each household.  There is no way to sugar coat these issues, or redirect blame to others.  We as citizens must fix ourselves before we can hope to fix the world. 

Protests are important because they shed light on the systemic problems we all face.  And while the Occupy Wall Street protest is focused on the “haves” and the “have-nots” [yes, it really is that simple, no matter how you couch it], it will force us to look at what has caused this chasm between the classes.  Both sides in this, the 1% and the 99% have forgotten that we share a dichotomous relationship.  The 1% cannot exist without the 99%, and the way of life desired by the 99% cannot exist without the 1%.  This means that the 1% are people who provide a service that the rest of us require or want — whether it be a software giant like Microsoft, or a media giant like News Corp, or a bank Giant like AIG.  The 99% create the 1% by needs and wants.  I want an iPhone, so I will give $200 to Apple, and $75  a month to Verizon.   We are not being forced to buy these products.  We want to buy these products. 

The banks failed because we wanted houses bigger than we needed or could afford.  Does a family of three need a 5000 square foot house?  Probably not.  But we live in America where that is possible, but we cannot blame everyone else when we can’t make our house payment.  We have built this empire of wants and needs all on our own.  We need Coach purses, SUVs, LED TVs, Laptops, iPads, Xboxes and Smart Phones.  All these things we think we need, but we really actually just want it.  Blaming the banks for giving us large mortgages we can’t possibly pay is like blaming the bartender for giving you too many drinks that made you sick.  We must have personal accountability. 

I have spent time evaluating my own purchases and how I use them.  I’ve bought things that were fairly costly, only to let them sit in a drawer somewhere, because I “might” need it at some point.  Did I need a smart phone? Not really, I just got it because everyone else had one.  Do I need an SUV? No, I need a compact car for my commute.  But, all these things I bought under my own volition, and as such I have gladly supported the rise of the 1% to suit my own desires.  And this is the rub in it all.  If we feel that the rich are too rich, then we need to stop buying their products that making them richer — otherwise, we need to cherish the things we have and stop complaining.  It’s just that simple.

I understand that people are frustrated that the 1% are so much more well off than the 99%, but we have to accept the fact that we have done all this to ourselves.  We bought the things that made them rich.  We buy these things because we think we need them.  If we want to change this, it has to start with each of us.  Its been said many times before, but we must be accountable for ourselves, and the outcomes of our actions.  We have to evaluate our lives, and only then can we change the world.

Occupy Wall Street has opened my eyes, not only to the perceived injustice, but to the frivolity of my own life.  I want to change the world.  I just thought I would share my opinion, in case you feel the same way.

 

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Apocalypse? Perhaps.

It has been a very long time since I’ve had the time to blog. After my spaces account was shut down, I hadn’t had time to set up a new wordpress blog, and get back into the zen of blogifying my brain. But today, I feel compelled to put out my thoughts for everyone else to digest.

As 2012 approaches, every crack pot in the world has come up with some sort of vision, theory, justification, math equation, quantification and pontification about the end of the world, (and/or the Mayan prophecy). From the dawn of humankind, we have prophesied some sort of end to our existence here on planet Earth, but for what reason? Sure, the sun will eventually burn out, first swelling into a red giant, consuming most of the inner planets, then deflating into a glistening white dwarf. And yes, this will most certainly kill everyone still living on the planet. And considering we’ve cut all our spending on space exploration, for the time being, we won’t be finding any methods of leaving the planet any time soon – so we are left with our fears of annihilation.

We have become arrogant on so many levels — too arrogant considering how fragile we are, and how dangerous the universe is. At any moment, the sun can (and has before) unleash a violent flare that could easily change the course of our history. There are so many ways to die in the universe, so many things we can’t ever prevent. We scurry from place to place, most of us blissfully ignorant of the fact that at any moment, without warning, it can all end. Remember the dinosaurs? One day they’re happily eating leaves (and each other), then *BAM!* they are consumed in a fireball that engulfs the planet, nearly extinguishing all life on the planet. Nearly.

I was amused and angered by the ravings of Harold Camping and his disastrous miscalculation of the end of the world, which he had convinced his followers was May 21, 2011. But as you know, the end did not come and many people left their homes, families and jobs to obey the ravings of a madman turned prophet,  who had already been wrong before (not once but twice!). Despite this failure, he still persists in his message that the “Spiritual Rapture” had occurred, and the physical rapture was on October 21st, 2011 — which we also know, has come and gone.  He’s already taken all his followers money and misled them to the point where they must live the rest of their lives, knowing they were misled by a fool. And so many fools have come before him. 

Is there an apocalypse coming? Well what exactly is an apocalypse? If you take the literal definition, it means “total destruction”. If you take the biblical meaning, it is “a disclosure of something hidden from the majority of mankind in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception” or “lifting the veil”. So regardless of how we define it, an apocalypse has happened many times before and will happened again. But it doesn’t have to be something occult or paranormal, such as the wrath of god, or the zombie plague. It will probably be something fairly normal, yet greatly disregarded – like the sun, an asteroid, or the collapse of the technology infrastructure.

So why am I babbling about all this? Because there is a simple fact we all forget — it can all end at any moment. Which means you can only be sure of the moment you’re in, the moment you are living in right now.  One of the greatest lessons I’ve learned in my life thus far is the Zen idea of enjoying “Right Now”.  I am just as guilty as everyone when it comes to this.  We are always looking to the horizon, instead of right around us.  Sure, we must plan to some extent, but to what extent? 

I don’t want to look forward to the end of the world.  I don’t want to worry about an apocalypse.  I want to live my life living happily in each moment.  And that is probably one of the most difficult things we as humans have to learn.  Living in each moment, when I actually get to do it, is really quite awesome.  I get glimpses of it in my life, but it is not something I can sustain on a regular basis.  I am working towards it, but we all have to work towards it.  If we all worked together on living for now, we wouldn’t have the problems we have today that threaten our world, and make some people long for the end. [I’ve got my money on Zombie Apocalypse Scenario though]

So the question ultimately becomes, “If it isn’t fun, then why are we doing it?”