Self-Publishing is Not a Sin

Greetings, Dreamers!

Today I wanted to just talk a bit about Self-Publishing for all my friends and followers who are also self-publishing.  I have learned a great deal about the industry, and the traditional publishers are starting to see that they are quickly becoming antiquated.

My first book Waking Dream: Devlin is actually published through a real publisher.  However, my novellas and Immortal Memories are self published.

After a great deal of thought, it occurred to me that most publishers are now moving to Print On Demand and eBook services.  The same exact services that one can get through Amazon, CreateSpace or Smashwords. So I’ve decided, at least for the moment, to stay with self-publishing.  But here are some observations that you may find helpful.

Good Investments:

If you are not a graphic designer, then you should definitely get someone to design the cover for you.  The cover does say a lot about a book, regardless of the saying.  I have read some really terrible books with amazing covers, and some really good books with very bland covers.  But customers do judge your book by the cover.  It is worth paying 300 to 400 dollars for a nice cover.

If you are not an editor yourself, you should definitely have someone edit your work.  But, you can do it yourself if you turn on ALL of the proofing features in your Word Processor, and read why it is flagging something.  But, it is a good investment to get a good editor to make sure that the book flows, that you have continuity in tense, and the dreaded “missing word” syndrome which I often suffer from.  Make sure you get an editor that likes your genre, any old editor will not do, and make sure they have a good track record.

If you are not familiar with print formatting, it can be very difficult.  There are many videos and articles on formatting your book for print, but it is usually fairly cheap to have a professional do it for you.

After that, the only other good investment is making sure YOU read your novel a few times.  When you think you’re done, read it one more time.  Yes, it can get tedious, but it is a very good investment in your time if you want to be successful.

Bad Investments:

Do not ever pay for reviews.  The only thing a reviewer should get is a copy of your book.  Paid reviews are a waste of money, and you run the risk of paying money for a terrible review.  There are many blog reviewers on WordPress.  You simply have to send them a query and ask if they’d be interested.

Ads on Facebook, Twitter, or GoodReads are a waste of money you can invest in other things, such as flyers, business cards, posters and copies to sign at an event.  I did a great deal of experimentation on this, and I have found unless you are willing to shell out thousands of dollars for high profile websites, you are just throwing money down the drain.  You should be the advertiser.  You can go to forums, join book clubs, and groups on various social media outlets.  You are your own best marketer.  You wrote it, so you know how to sell your book.

Swag item give-aways are another waste of money.  Most people will come get your swag, then leave.  If you want to do give-aways of your books for reviews, that is the best thing you can give away.

Do not pay for entry into an award!  Any award that requires you to pay for it, is probably not reputable, and the award will mean nothing.  Some of the real book awards, such as the Bram Stoker, or the Amazon Breakout Novel Award are reputable, and they also will consider self-published books.  There are many others out there, you just have to do some searching.

Organizations:

A professional writer’s organization is an excellent investment.  Some require you to have been published, even if its just a short story.  I am a member of the Horror Writers Association which does not require you to be published to become a member.  The Author’s Guild will also allow self-published authors once they hit a certain number of sales.  But they both offer services that help authors establish themselves and become more successful.

Social Media:

Here is one of the biggest things I’ve been analysing for quite some time.  I have found that the best social media outlet to advertise your book is Twitter, without a doubt.  But, you should be thoughtful about your tweets, and don’t tweet every 5 minutes “Buy my book”. You should craft a variety of tweets, trying to include your tag-lines, or short quotes, or even review excerpts.  You can # the genre you are in, and ask for RTs.  Which brings me to my next point, followers.

Finding followers is an onerous task.  You shouldn’t just start following anyone you see in your recommended, or other author’s followers.  Use the search tool to find tweets by people who like you genre or the themes in your book.  Follow these people.  Also follow other authors, because its not a competition.  Writers are readers too, and I have found that they will RT you if you return the favor. Make sure that only 25 to 30 % of your tweets are about your book.  Tweet links to things related to your book subject matter, or other books in your genre.  Let your followers know that you’re a real person, and ALWAYS respond to your followers when appropriate. Remember, you need them more than they need you.

The next most important social media aspect is blogging.  You are a writer, so you can certainly come up with things to blog about!  This allows your readers to see what kind of person you are, how well your write, and it allows you to engage them in comments.  Blogging has been the biggest part of gaining readership.  If they like your blog, chances are, they will buy your books.  And don’t just blog about your books.  Blog about writing and offer tips.  Write flash fiction, short stories or poems.  Anything that will show your fans that you are dedicated to being a writer, and not just sitting back waiting for the millions to come rolling in.

Pricing:

Be reasonable when pricing your book.  There is nothing wrong with a .99 cent book.  In general, readers are more apt to buy your book if its between .99 cents and 4.99, depending on the length.  If you are self publishing,  the lower the better to get lots of people buying and reading it, and hopefully review it.  My guideline is usually, .99 cents for anything less than 17K words, between 17K and 40K  1.99 to 2.99 and anything above that between 2.99 and up.  Pretty simple really.

My final note on self-publishing is that you have to be patient, diligent and realistic.  The publishing world is changing, so don’t give up just because you have slow sales.  Keep writing, be prolific, and make sure your work is polished.  There are more than enough readers in the world, and they will always want new books to read.

Whether you are self-published or traditionally published, you will not be quitting your day job with your first book.  At least not when its initially released!

Good luck!

About these ads

9 thoughts on “Self-Publishing is Not a Sin”

  1. “Missing word” syndrome? Holy crap, it’s not just me??

    Your points are well taken. Re: hiring an editor, though, I’ve found it very difficult, because most of the rates I’ve seen quoted would mean shelling out $1500 to $2000 a novel, something not really feasible for me even when I’m employed (and not at all at the moment). I’m trying to cover that gap with beta readers.

    But on the whole, thank you for the information– very helpful.

    1. I’m glad is not just me! Haha!

      Actually, CreateSpace offers very reasonable editing starting at 210 dollars. You should check them out. Also, a friend of my is an editor and she is very flexible on pricing. Moniquehappy.com

      Glad you found this useful! Always happy to help my fellow authors!

    1. Thank you! I learned the hard way for sure. But you can be successful without a publisher. You just have to be committed to being your own marketing and promotion company :) I’m glad it was helpful!

  2. Paying cash for a negative review…that makes me laugh on the inside. The world is full of negativity, I’d imagine there’s enough to go around for free! I’m sure it’s happened to someone, though. Thanks for the tips!

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s